Queso Paraguay / kesú paraguai

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Cheese Paraguay / kesú Paraguai

The cheese from Paraguay is undoubtedly the quintessential ingredient in Paraguayan popular gastronomy. It would not be Paraguayan cuisine without "Kesu Paraguai." The name "Kesu Paraguai," by which it is known in Paraguay, became the guarantee of cheese-related vocations (a product obtained by curdling milk with specific characteristics for each type depending on its origin or manufacturing process) and "Paraguay," the name of the country where it originated. The use of the word "Paraguái," with the Latin "i" instead of the Greek "et," is due to the fact that the "Y" in Guaraní is pronounced differently from how it sounds in Spanish and always refers to "water."

Kesu Paraguai is a special type of cheese made from curd, which is prepared by combining pure milk with rennet (a part of the digestive tract of certain ruminants that separates lactic acid during digestion). It is usually unsalted and, being made from "whole" milk (not skimmed or low-fat milk), it becomes very creamy and nutritious. It has a soft texture and a mildly salty and slightly tangy flavor, with a shelf life of 45 days.

While the production of Kesu Paraguai originated in the "Séjours" (haciendas intended for cultivation, particularly cattle) of Paraguay, today it is mainly produced in Mennonite colonies located in the Paraguayan Chaco region. Traditional Paraguayan preparations such as Mbejú, Paraguayan soup, and Chipa all incorporate Paraguay cheese. Although it is an essential ingredient in the aforementioned recipes, Kesu Paraguay by itself can be quite plain.

Unfortunately, the quality of Paraguayan cheese has decreased in recent years. When very fresh, it has a subtle flavor that makes it an excellent accompaniment to sweet flavors. In Paraguay, a piece of fresh cheese is often paired with Guayaba Sweet or Cane honey for dessert. As the days go by, Kesu Paraguay develops a strong odor (sometimes extremely pungent) and becomes hard and slightly oily with a yellow color. In this state, it is used for Chipa, soup, and other typical dishes.

Regarding cheese consumption, most Paraguayans only eat Kesu Paraguay since it is almost the only type of cheese produced locally. In urban areas, there is more variety.


  • The cheese from Paraguay is an essential ingredient in Paraguayan cuisine.

  • Kesu Paraguai is the name by which this cheese is known in Paraguay.

  • The word "Paraguái" is used instead of "et" to highlight the difference in pronunciation.

  • Kesu Paraguai is made from curdled milk and is usually unsalted.

  • It is very creamy and nutritious, thanks to being made from whole milk.

  • Its texture is soft, and it has a mildly salty and slightly tangy flavor.

  • The cheese has a shelf life of 45 days.

  • Kesu Paraguai production originated in the Séjours of Paraguay.

  • Today, it is primarily produced by colonies of Mennonites in the Paraguayan Chaco region.

  • Paraguayan dishes like Mbejú, Paraguayan soup, and Chipa all include Paraguay cheese.

  • The quality of Paraguayan cheese has declined in recent years.

  • When very fresh, it pairs well with sweet flavors like Guayaba Sweet or Cane honey.

  • Over time, Kesu Paraguay develops a strong odor and becomes hard and slightly oily.

  • For certain dishes like Chipa and soup, the cheese is used in its aged form.

  • Most Paraguayans primarily consume Kesu Paraguay since it is the most widely available cheese in the country.

  • Urban areas offer a greater variety of cheeses.

In conclusion, Kesu Paraguay, also known as cheese from Paraguay, is a crucial ingredient in Paraguayan cuisine. With its creamy texture, mildly salty and slightly tangy flavor, it adds a unique dimension to traditional Paraguayan dishes. While the quality of Paraguayan cheese has declined in recent years, it remains an integral part of the local culinary heritage. Whether enjoyed fresh with sweet accompaniments or aged for specific preparations, Kesu Paraguay continues to hold a special place in the hearts and palates of the Paraguayan people.

✓ Paraguay